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Keep Your Cool
If you handle the crisis calmly,
it might not be as bad as it
first seems.
Happy Hosts
Don't be a Campground
Bully!  Smile, know your
campground so you can give
your campers the best
options on where to camp.
Pampering Campers
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More Hosting Tips
Rock Painting - a craft to discourage:
So think about it.  Isn't rock painting another word for graffitti; otherwise known as
vandalism?   Some creative parents are just trying to get their children to connect
with nature by using it as a canvas for their creativity.  However, just like removing
or destroying trees and wildflowers are prohibited so the next person can enjoy
them, so are rocks.  Maybe encouraging parents to use sidewalk chalk instead of
paint would be better.  Chalk washes off with the rain
.
Pet Cleanup:  Try to give the campers something tangible for their money. If your
campground charges a fee for pets, consider providing small plastic bags for pet
cleanup. Look for distributors of the T-shirt style bags. These allow them to be
easily tied after picking up the mess. Encourage your customers to clean up after
themselves while giving them something for their money.
"Yogi Bears":  A "Yogi Bear" is a young person who rides their bike through the
campgrounds repeatedly. They are looking for coolers that might have alcoholic
beverages and campers who have their guard down and will be likely to leave their
coolers out when they go to bed. These Yogi's may even get into coolers in broad
daylight if the campers are temporarily out of the campsite.
Customer Service:  Smile at your customers.  They are the reason you have this
opportunity.  People enjoy laughing.  Find some way to connect with them or joke
with them.  Spare the sarcasm, though, not everyone appreciates it.
Hate those Meeces to Pieces:  Here we go, A tip to discourage mice from coming
in for snacks during your hosting visits........Steel wool in holes or gaps of 1/4 inch
or more, they don't like to chew that stuff....Thanks for the tip Gil.
Poisonous Plants:  Get to know the local plants, especially the poisonous ones.  
Display pictures and related information, at your Host Site, to alert your campers.  
You can find pictures and information about most plants on the Internet.
Restroom Reading Materials:  Post Campground Rules, Emergency Contacts
and other useful information on the inside of the restroom stall doors.
Children's Activities:  The children are future campers.  If they have fun, they will
bring their parents back. Help them have fun.  Check out the games by clicking on
the
Activities button above.
Wildlife Hints:  Do a little research before getting to your next assignment.  Be
aware of the local wildlife.  Use the Internet or local wildlife resource personnel to
discover applicable safety tips.  Some include: 1) Don't try to pet wild animals. 2)
Keep a large tree between you and a moose. You cannot outrun a moose but you
can out maneuver them.  3) Never feed the animals.  Feeding them disturbs their
natural instinct to forage.  They become dependent on an unnatural and unreliable
source.
Garbage Hints:  Small trash cans in the ladies room stalls help keep the garbage
under control.  Also, if you only have a few dumpsters spread out in the
campground, smaller trash cans (50 gallon) outside the restrooms can also
reduce a litter problem.
Non-paying Customers:  Acknowledge each customer as they enter your park.  
Even if you are not in an entrance booth, smile and wave at each customer.  This
lets them know that you see them.  They are less likely to skip out without paying if
they know you see them.  Of course, some still just look away and pretend they
don't see you.  However, certain stores have shown that "greeters" reduce
shoplifting just by looking the person in the eye when they enter the store.
Trouble Campers:  Drive or walk through your campground several times a day.  
Wave at your campers.  The troublemakers will usually avoid even looking at you,
let alone waving back.  You'll know to keep a closer eye on those who avoid you.
Local Recreation:  Get to know the recreation opportunities surrounding your
campground.  The Internet is a great source.  However, the campers are also a
great source.  If they tell you they are regulars at your campground, ask them what
they like to do in the area.  Then pass this information along to the campers who
are not familiar with the area.
Toilet Bowl Stains:  After cleaning the toilet bowl, use an Armorall Wipe around the
top edge of the bowl to keep urine from sticking.
Save Your Back:  Use extended handle grabbers to pick up garbage.  You can find
them at your local hardware stores or wholesale home improvement stores.
Reduce Costs:  Use buckets for garbage pickup instead of disposable bags.
Pit Toilet Ventilation:  Solar powered vent fans, found at your local hardware store
or wholesale home improvement store, are economical ventilation for pit toilets.
Day Use Tips:  People using the Day Use areas are the toughest customers.  No
one wants to pay for just an hour or two of use.  Collecting fees in Day Use areas
requires a lot of creativity.  Be sure to ask your manager how much leeway you
have before you implement any programs but here are a few ideas:  1) Find a way
to publicize the rewarding of "good behavior", i.e. "Free Firewood With
Pre-Payment", 2) pay per hour or half-day rates, 3) Buy 3, get 4th day FREE
High Use Items:  Keep a supply on hand of these items that campers frequently
run out of: small boxes of matches, lantern mantles and band aids.  You can
either charge a fee for them for a small profit or just give them out as a goodwill
gesture.  You could even get creative with the matchboxes and stick on a company
label with phone number.
Principles Above Personalities:  You are bound to come in contact with
personalities that you do not get along with.  Remember to keep principles above
personalities when dealing with these people.
Safety/Security Lighting:  Help to stop firewood pilfering.  Add a wireless motion
censor to a light underneath your RV when parked.  Motion sensor lighting is used
on homes as a security feature, why not your RV?  Find these at your local home
improvement warehouse, hardware store or discount store.
Campsite Cleaning :  Even if you have the use of a vehicle to maintain your
campground, occasionally walking through your campground is recommended.  
You see more by walking through the campsites than just driving by.  Park and
walk through several sites then drive to the next set of sites to do the same.
Economical Lighting:  Installing timers on restroom lights saves energy and
money.  Check the timers once a month to keep them accurate.
Toilet Paper Savings:  Mounting toilet paper rolls on a flat bar instead of a round
pipe will keep the toilet paper from "accidentally" spinning out of control and
wasting paper.  Flatten the cardboard tube, before mounting, by pushing the roll
against the wall.
Pit Toilet Cleanup:  Use an oven cleaner to remove the schtuff inside a pit toilet.  
Spray it on and let it soak in just like you do to clean your oven.  Then use your
toilet brush to remove it.  Then spray oil (like WD-40 or PAM cooking spray) on the
inside so future deposits slide off.  (Or use bacon grease to give your campers an
extra wildlife experience! tee hee hee) Don't use easy off too often. We found the
beginning of the season did the trick and WD-40/Armor-all/PAM-like stuff all
worked great, and kept them clean.
Bug lights are used a lot in our campgrounds. They are usually 3 times as
expensive as regular bulbs.  So, buy compact florescent light bulbs and spray
paint them yellow. The cooler lights will not burn the paint off and CFL's will lower
the electric bill.
Vault Toilet Ventilation:
You know those stacks on the vault toilets? Those are for ventilation. For proper
ventilation, though, there must be a 3 to 5 foot clearance of branches around the
vent opening.
A Soft Voice Turneth Away Anger:
Okay, you all know those people who try to get their way by turning up the volume?  
Well, here's what you do.  You turn down the volume on your voice and take a slow,
step closer to them.  They'll get quiet too as they strain to hear what you are saying.
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